Josh Barnett Responds To Steroid Allegations

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Josh Barnett releases statement via his MySpace:

Many of you are wondering what’s happening. What I can say is that when applying for my license, the CSAC asked for me to submit a urine sample for testing prior to granting my license as they do with everyone, I believe. It was not a random test. I had no reason to believe there would be any issues and went in to submit my sample at the earliest possible opportunity on June 25th. I never once thought there would be a problem.

My representatives and I are working to gather as much info as possible and handle this situation as best as we can. I am embarrassed and want for nothing more than to resolve this issue and receive a license from the State of California as I have done many times already and for other states as well.
I am very thankful for all the great family, friends and fans that still support me.

Barnett will have a hard time convincing the CSAC of his innocence. This is the second time Barnett tested positive for steroids. After winning the UFC heavyweight title from Randy Couture at UFC 36, Barnett was stripped of the belt after testing positive for three banned substances.

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CSAC Denies License To Josh Barnett Due To Positive Steroid Test

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The California State Athletic Commission (CSAC) has denied a license to Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) fighter Josh Barnett after Barnett tested positive for a banned substance.

Barnett’s June 25 drug test came back positive for 2a-methyl-5a-androstan-3a-ol-17-one, an anabolic steroid. CSAC learned of the results July 21 and immediately denied a license for Barnett. CSAC also informed the promoter of Barnett’s August 1 bout against Fedor Emelianenko that the bout would not be approved.

“The license of Josh Barnett was denied pursuant to rule 303 of Title IV of the California Code of Regulations,” said CSAC Interim Executive Officer Dave Thornton. “That rule prohibits the use of certain substances, including anabolic agents, by any boxer or MMA fighter.”

Barnett’s test was observed in the presence of a CSAC representative and the sample was sent to the World Anti-doping Agency test facility at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) on June 25 for processing. CSAC was notified of the results yesterday.

Barnett has the right to appeal the denial of his license.

“Our primary concern is for the health and safety of fighters,” said Thornton. “Anabolic agents and other banned substances put the users of those agents at risk, as well as their opponents. The commission simply will not tolerate their use.”

CSAC has among the toughest drug testing standards of any Athletic Commission in the country.